Unhappily, North Carolina goes with the Flo

        Hurricanes that begin with the letter 'F' – indeed that begin with the letters F-L-O -- have a thing for North Carolina. The strongest storms of the last two decades have been Floyd and Florence. Last month’s Florence created a group of disasters that will take years to clean up, including runaway waste produced by hogs, the carcasses of dead turkeys, and ash, a toxic by-product of coal that overflowed its containers in the eastern part of the state. We recap the storm damage in North Carolina, including an update on a few North Carolina and South Carolina golf communities, in this month’s Home On The Course newsletter, which will mail electronically in the next couple of days.
        No place on earth seems totally safe from extreme weather.  Sure, you expect it to rain at a moment's notice in Scotland, where I spent 10 days in September, and you certainly expect the wind to blow.  But at 100 mph? That is what happened in September in Dundee and other locations across the nation. I made it out of Edinburgh barely 15 minutes before authorities closed the Forth Bridge because of high winds. The previous day, at Dunbar Golf Club, I played in gusts up to 50 mph.  There were a few shots where you just could not hit the ball hard enough.  It was a unique, and intimidating, experience. More in this month’s Home On The Course. To subscribe, click here.